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OLYMPIC GAMES
OLYMPIC GAMES
OLYMPIC GAMES
OLYMPIC GAMES
OLYMPIC GAMES

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OLYMPIC GAMES

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  • HISTORY OF THE MODERN OLYMPICS
  • THE OLYMPIC MOVEMENT
  • SYMBOLS OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES
  • THE OLYMPIC GAMES AND THE CITIES
  • T&T MEDALS AT THE OLYMPICS
  • T&T'S OLYMPIC MEDAL WINNERS
  • T&T BEIJING 2008 OLYMPIC TEAM
  • T&T LONDON 2012 OLYMPIC TEAM

HISTORY OF THE MODERN OLYMPICS
The Olympics or Olympic Games is a multi-sport event which takes place every four years. The games are a revival of the Olympic Games held in ancient Greece. They were revived by a French nobleman, Baron de Coubertin, in 1894, with the objective of promoting international peace and understanding through sporting competition. The Summer Olympics is formally called the Games of the Olympiad. The first Olympiad was held in Athens, Greece.

The Winter Olympics, established in 1924, features winter sports held in ice or snow and is also held every four years. Until 1994, the Winter and Summer Olympics were held in the same year, but in 1986 the International Olympic Committee, which organises the Olympics, decided to separate them, so as to spread costs for all involved parties.

THE OLYMPIC MOVEMENT
Several organisations are involved in organising the Olympic Games. Together they form the Olympic Movement. These organisations are governed by certain rules and guidelines which are outlined in the Olympic Charter.

At the heart of the Olympic Movement is the International Olympic Committee (IOC), currently headed by Jacques Rogge. It can be seen as the government of the Olympics, as it takes care of the daily problems and makes all important decisions, such as the host city of the Games and the programme of the Olympics.

Three groups of organisations operate on a more specialised level:

  • International Federations (IFs) - the governing bodies of a sport
  • National Olympic Committees (NOCs) - which regulate the Olympic Movement within one country
  • Organising Committees for the Olympic Games (OCOGs) - which take care of the organisation of a specific celebration of the Olympics. These are dissolved after the celebration of the games, when all paperwork has been done.

SYMBOLS OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES

THE OLYMPIC RINGS
The Olympic rings were designed by Baron Pierre de Coubertin. They comprise five intertwined rings in the colors blue, yellow, black, green, and red, set upon a white background. These intertwined rings represent the unity of the five continents. The rings were introduced at the Antwerp Games in 1920.

The rings are also featured on the Olympic flag which is hoisted at the start of each celebration of the Olympics. The flag is three meters long and two meters wide.

THE OLYMPIC CREED
The Olympic Creed states: "The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well."

THE OLYMPIC FLAME
The Olympic Flame or Olympic Fire is a symbol of the Olympic Games. It commemorates the theft of fire from the Greek god Zeus by Prometheus. In Ancient Greece a fire was kept burning throughout the celebration of the ancient Olympics. The fire was reintroduced at the Olympics in 1928. As with the Ancient Olympics, once the flame has been lit, it is kept burning throughout the celebration of the Olympics, and is extinguished at end of the closing ceremony of the Games.

THE OLYMPIC TORCH RELAY
The Olympic Torch Relay, which culminates in the lighting of the Olympic cauldron at the Opening Ceremony of each Games, was introduced in 1936 at the Berlin Games. It was created to symbolize the link between the ancient and modern Olympic Games.

The Torch is lighted in Olympia several months before the opening celebration of the Olympic Games at the site of the ancient Olympics in Olympia, Greece, and brought to the host city by runners carrying the torch in relay. The Olympic Torch Relay ends on the day of the opening ceremony in the central stadium of the Games. The final torch bearer runs to the cauldron and, using the torch, starts the flame in the stadium.

OPENING CEREMONY
The traditional part of the ceremony starts with a parade of nations, during which most participating athletes march into the stadium country by country. One athlete from each country carries the flag of his or her nation, leading the entourage of other athletes from that country. After all nations have entered, the organizing country's head of state formally opens the Olympics.

The Olympic Anthem is then played, and the Olympic flag is hoisted in the stadium. The runner before the last in the Olympic Flame Relay brings the torch into the stadium, passing the flame to the last carrier. The last torch bearer then lights the fire in the stadium's cauldron. This is followed by the release of doves, symbolising peace. Finally, the flag bearers of all countries circle a rostrum, where one athlete and one referee will give the Olympic Oath, stating that they will compete and judge according to the rules.

THE CLOSING CEREMONY
The athletes march around the stadium randomly, instead of nation by nation. The Olympic fire is then extinguished, and the Olympic flag is lowered, folded, and presented to the mayor of the host city of the next Olympic Games. The IOC president ends the ceremonies by declaring the Games closed.

THE MEDALS
Olympic medals are awarded to those individuals or teams placing first, second, and third in each event. The first place winner receives a gold-plated medal of silver, which is commonly referred to as the "gold medal." Second and third places receive medals of silver and bronze respectively. The silver used in the first and second place medals must be at least 92.5% pure. The "gold" medals must be gilded with at least six grams of pure gold. Medals also carry the name of the sport contested.

The medals given at the Olympic Winter Games differ from the traditional medals given at the Summer Games. Each Organizing Committee designs its own medals that must be approved by the IOC.

Competitors who finish in the 1st through 8th places in an Olympic event receive an award diploma. The IOC awards commemorative pins to each athlete who participates in the Olympic Games.

THE OLYMPIC GAMES AND THE OLYMPIC CITIES

SUMMER OLYMPICS WINTER OLYMPICS
1896 - Athens, Greece
1900 - Paris, France
1904 - St. Louis, United States
1908 - London, United Kingdom
1912 - Stockholm, Sweden
1920 - Antwerp, Belgium*
1924 - Paris, France
1928 - Amsterdam, Netherlands
1932 - Los Angeles, United States
1936 - Berlin, Germany
1948 - London, United Kingdom*
1952 - Helsinki, Finland
1956 - Melbourne, Australia
1960 - Rome, Italy
1964 - Tokyo, Japan
1968 - Mexico City, Mexico
1972 - Munich, West Germany (now Germany)
1976 - Montreal, Canada
1980 - Moscow, U.S.S.R. (Now Russia)
1984 - Los Angeles, United States
1988 - Seoul, South Korea
1992 - Barcelona, Spain
1996 - Atlanta, United States
2000 - Sydney, Australia
2004 - Athens, Greece
2008 - Beijing, China
2012 - London, United Kingdom
1924 - Chamonix, France
1928 - St. Moritz, Switzerland
1932 - Lake Placid, N.Y., United States
1936 - Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany
1948 - St. Moritz, Switzerland*
1952 - Oslo, Norway
1956 - Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy
1960 - Squaw Valley, California, United States
1964 - Innsbruck, Austria
1968 - Grenoble, France
1972 - Sapporo, Japan
1976 - Innsbruck, Austria
1980 - Lake Placid, New York, United States
1984 - Sarajevo, Yugoslavia (now Bosnia and Herzegovina)
1988 - Calgary, Alberta, Canada
1992 - Albertville, France**
1994 - Lillehammer, Norway**
1998 - Nagano, Japan
2002 - Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
2006 - Torino (Turin), Italy
2010 - Vancouver, Canada
2014 - Sochi, Russia

*Due to World War I and II, Summer Olympic Games were not held in 1916, 1940, and 1944. Due to World War II, Winter Olympic Games were not held in 1940 and 1944.

**The 1992 and 1994 Winter Games are two years apart due to the transition of the Winter Games to alternating even-numbered years with regard to the Summer Games.

MEDALS AT THE OLYMPICS

GAMES NAME MEDAL EVENT
2012 London, UK Keshorn Walcott Gold Javelin
2012 London, UK Keston Bledman Bronze Athletics 4x100 Relay
2012 London, UK Marc Burns Bronze Athletics 4x100 Relay
2012 London, UK Richard Thompson Bronze Athletics 4x100 Relay
2012 London, UK Emmanuel Callender Bronze Athletics 4x100 Relay
2012 London, UK Lalonde Gordon Bronze Athletics 4x400 Relay
2012 London, UK Jarrin Solomon Bronze Athletics 4x400 Relay
2012 London, UK Ade Alleyne-Forte Bronze Athletics 4x400 Relay
2012 London, UK Deon Lendore Bronze Athletics 4x400 Relay
2012 London, UK Lalonde Gordon Bronze Athletics 400m
2008 Beijing, China Richard Thompson Silver Athletics 100m
2008 Beijing, China Keston Bledman Silver Athletics 4x100 Relay
2008 Beijing, China Marc Burns Silver Athletics 4x100 Relay
2008 Beijing, China Richard Thompson Silver Athletics 4x100 Relay
2008 Beijing, China Emmanuel Callender Silver Athletics 4x100 Relay
2004 Athens, Greece George Bovell III Bronze Swimming 200m
2000 Sydney, Australia Ato Boldon Silver Athletics 100m
2000 Sydney, Australia Ato Boldon Bronze Athletics 200m
1996 Atlanta, USA Ato Boldon Bronze Athletics 100m
1996 Atlanta, USA Ato Boldon Bronze Athletics 200m
1976 Montreal, Canada Hasley Crawford Gold Athletics 100m
1964 Tokyo, Japan Wendell Mottley Silver Athletics 400m
1964 Tokyo, Japan Edwin Roberts Bronze Athletics 200m
1964 Tokyo, Japan Edwin Roberts Bronze Athletics 4x400 Relay
1964 Tokyo, Japan Edwin Skinner Bronze Athletics 4x400 Relay
1964 Tokyo, Japan Kent Bernard Bronze Athletics 4x400 Relay
1964 Tokyo, Japan Wendell Mottley Bronze Athletics 4x400 Relay
1952 Helsinki, Finland Rodney Wilkes Bronze Weightlifting
1952 Helsinki, Finland Lennox Kilgour Bronze Weightlifting
1948 Lodon, England Rodney Wilkes Silver Weightlifting

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO DELEGATION FOR THE 2008 BEIJING OLYMPIC GAMES
The 2008 Olympic Games set for August 8th to 24th will be held in Beijing, China where a 30 member team of athletes will represent Trinidad and Tobago. The team which is the 15th contingent to represent Trindad and Tobago at the Olympics, consists of twenty-five track and field representatives, three swimmers and one representative from shooting and table tennis each.

Michael Valentine Chef de Mission
Wendell Labastide Assistant General Team Manager
Hasely Crawford Olympic Ambassador

TRACK AND FIELD

MEN   WOMEN  
Richard Thompson 100m, 200m, 4x100m Kelly-Ann Baptiste 100m, 4x100m
Marc Burns 100m, 4x100m Semoy Hackett 100m, 4x100m
Darrel Brown 100m, 4x100m Sasha Springer-Jones 100m, 4x100m
Keston Bledman 4x100m Wanda Hutson 100m, 4x100m
Emmanuel Callender 4x100m Monique Cabral 4x100m
Aaron Armstrong 200m, 4x100m Ayanna Hutchinson 4x100m
Rondell Sorillo 200m Aleesha Barber 100m Hurdles
Renny Quow 400m, 4x400m Josanne Lucas 400m Hurdles
Ato Stephens 400m, 4x400m Rhonda Watkins Long Jump
Stan Waithe 4x400m Cleopatra Borel Brown Shot Put
Zwede Hewitt 4x400m Candice Scott Hammer Throw
Cowin Mills 4x400m    
Jovon Toppin 4x400m    
Mekil Thomas 110m Hurdles    

SHOOTING

Roger Daniel 10 M Air Pisto
Ms. Atlantsetseg Byambajav (Mongolia) Coach
George Comissiong Manager
Dr. Ian Hypolite Assistant Manager
Gunness Persad Coach (Sprints & Relays)
Clayton Walkes Coach (Sprints & Relays)
John Andalcio Coach (Hurdles)
Nadine Hamid Coach (Throws)
Heathcliff Thorne Coach (Jumps)
David Cumberbatch Massage Therapist

SWIMMING

George Bovell III 50m, 100m freestyle
Nicholas Bovell  
Sharntelle Mc Lean 50m, 100m freestyle
George Bovell II Manager
Mathew Macedo Coach

TABLE TENNIS

Dexter St. Louis  
Reeza Burke Manager
Rheann Chung Coach

MEDICAL PERSONNEL

Dr. Terry Ali Chief medical Officer
Dr. Anyl Gopeesingh Sports Medicine Doctor
Ian Sharpe Massage Therapist (Assigned to Swimming)
Karielle De Bique Physiotherapist
Asha De Freitas Sports Trainer
June Durham Massage Therapist
Andre Ferguson Massage Therapist

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO DELEGATION FOR THE 2012 LONDON OLYMPIC GAMES
The 2012 Olympic Games set for July 27th to August 12th will be held in London, England. The team is the 16th contingent to represent Trindad and Tobago at the Olympics.

 

Annette Knott Chef de Mission
Wendell Labastide Assistant to the Chef de Mission

ATHLETICS

MEN   WOMEN  
Richard Thompson 100m, 4 x 100m Kelly-Ann Baptiste 100m, 4x100m
Marc Burns 100m, 4x100m Semoy Hackett 100m, 200m, 4x100m
Rondell Sorillo 100m, 200m, 4 x 100m Kai Selvon 100m, 200m, 4x100m
Keston Bledman 100m, 4 x 100m Michelle Lee Ahye 100m, 4x100m
Emmanuel Callender 4x100m Janeil Bellille 400m Hurdles
Jamol James 4x100m Ayanna Alexander Triple Jump
Deon Lendore 400m, 4 x 400m Cleopatra Borel Brown Shot Put
Renny Quow 400m, 4 x 400m Reyare Thomas 4x100m
Wayne Davis II 110m Hurdles Sparkle McKnight 4x100m
Mikel Thomas 110m Hurdles    
Jehue Gordon 400m Hurdles    
Keshorn Walcott Javelin    
Lalonde Gordon 400m, 4 x 400m    
Jarrin Solomon 4 x 400m    
Machel Cedenio 4 x 400m    
Ade Alleyne-Forte 4 x 400m    

 

Dexter Voisin Manager
Dr. Ian Hypolite Head Coach
Edwin Skinner Coach – Sprints/Hurdles
Gunness Persad Coach – Sprints/Hurdles
Ismael Lopez Mastrapa Coach - Throws

BOXING

Carlos Suarez Light Fly Weight (46-49Kg)
Reynold Cox Manager/ Coach
Raulson Dopwell Coach

CYCLING

Njisane Philip Sprint, Keirin
Peter Maharaj Manager/ Coach

SHOOTING

Roger Daniel 50m Pistol, 10m Air Pistol
Ms. Atlantsetseg Byambajav Coach

SWIMMING

George Bovell III 100m backstroke, 50m freestyle, 100m freestyle
George Bovell II Coach/ Manager

SAILING

Andrew Lewis Laser-Men’s One Person Dinghy
Fernando Alegre Coach
Kairon Serrette Manager

MEDICAL PERSONNEL

Dr. Terry Ali Chief Medical Officer
Dr. Anyl Gopeesingh Sports Medicine Doctor
Ian Sharpe Massage Therapist
Fitzbert Alleyne Massage Therapist
Zephyrinus Nicholas Massage Therapist
Oba Gulston Massage Therapist
Karielle De Bique Massage Therapist
Dr. Margaret Ottley Sport Psychologist